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Welcome to Growing for Market!

Growing for Market is America's most respected trade publication for local food producers. GFM keeps you informed about the business of growing and selling vegetables, fruits, cut flowers, plants, herbs, and other food products. If you are market gardening or farming, whatever your scale, we guarantee you'll find valuable information that will help make your business more profitable and enjoyable. Please join us today!

 

cover of February 2016 issue

In the February issue:

  • Interested in hydroponics? Andrew Mefferd explains the various systems and how to choose the right one for the crops you want to grow.
  • Can you be an organic hydroponic grower? Learn about the controversy and the likely outcome.
  • The new editor of GFM describes his journey from well-traveled farm apprentice to farmer to editor.
  • Selling produce versus selling convenience: Texas hydroponic grower Nick Burton explains why he chose the latter.
  • Oats are an easy-going cover crop with many uses. Pam Dawling tells how and when to plant them.
  • Selling flowers to supermarkets requires a high level of organization — and lots of flowers. Gretel Adams provides detailed information on how she grows enough to sell bouquets all season long.

Join as a Full Access member to get every issue as a PDF plus have access for one year to the Growing for Market archive. Or join as a Full Access PLUS member to get GFM by mail and have archive access.


Start a print subscription.

Start an online subscription.



NEW BOOKS — GFM subscribers get 20% off these and all books. To get the discount, log in first using the information provided in your current issue. Or phone us at 1-800-307-8949.

cover The Lean Farm bookThe Lean Farm by Ben Hartman. 

A practical, systems-based approach for a more sustainable farming operation.

To many people today, using the words “factory” and “farm” in the same sentence is nothing short of sacrilege. In many cases, though, the same sound business practices apply whether you are producing cars or carrots. Author Ben Hartman and other young farmers are increasingly finding that incorporating the best new ideas from business into their farming can drastically cut their wastes and increase their profits, making their farms more environmentally and economically sustainable. By
explaining the lean system for identifying and eliminating waste and introducing efficiency in every aspect of the farm operation, The Lean Farm makes the case that small-scale farming can be an attractive career option for young people who are interested in growing food for their community.

Working smarter, not harder, also prevents the kind of burnout that start-up farmers often encounter in the face of long, hard, backbreaking labor.


cover of Homemade for SaleHomemade for Sale: How to Set Up and Market a Food Business from Your Home Kitchen

During the most recent recession, 42 states enacted cottage food laws to encourage the development of small businesses. While the details vary from state to state, in general these laws allow small-scale production and sale of homemade food products, providing an opportunity for market farmers to extend their seasons and increase their profits. This book is a great starting point for understanding the laws and getting ideas for a new sideline on your farm.

 





cover of Market Farming SuccessMarket Farming Success (Second Edition)
by Lynn Byczynski

This is a newly revised and expanded edition of the bestselling introduction to the business end of market farming. Condensing decades of growiing experience from every part of the United States and Canada, it identifies key areas that usually trip up beginners and shows growers how to avoid common obstacles.

cover of The Market Gardener


The Market Gardener: A Successful Grower's Handbook for Small-Scale Organic Farming 
by Jean-Martin Fortier
A detailed look at a very small farm in Quebec, including crop plans and financial details. Prescriptive for some people, enlightening for all. 


cover of The Organic Seed GrowerThe Organic Seed Grower by John Navazio

A comprehensive manual for organic vegetable growers who would like to grow high-quality seed for their own use or to sell to seed companies. Clear instruction in growing vegetables for seed, selecting the best plants for local conditions, harvesting and processing seeds.

Getting a high tunnel? We have the resources you need to succeed year-round.

Hoophouse Handbook - Second Edition, Revised and Expanded

Year-Round Vegetable Production Box Set: Includes Winter Harvest Handbook and a DVD of a workshop presented by Eliot Coleman about his year-round production of vegetables in hoophouses and low tunnels.


Interested in growing flowers? Start here!

Growing for Market is Information Central for Cut Flowers. Our editor and publisher, Lynn Byczynski, wrote the book on small-scale commercial cut flower production: The Flower Farmer: An Organic Grower's Guide to Raising and Selling Cut Flowers. To purchase a signed copy, Click here

Every issue of GFM has a column by the best flower growers in the U.S. Erin Benzakein, who is both a grower and a talented floral designer, is our current columnist. You can read her by becoming a subscriber.

Frank and Pamela Arnosky wrote a regular flower column for Growing for Market for more than a decade. Their columns are collected in the book Local Color, available in print from the GFM bookstore. Or read it right now by downloading the E-book! We also sell Specialty Cut Flowers by Allan Armitage and Judy Laushman, which is the essential reference work on every kind of cut flower. You will open it every day in spring!

Cover of Local Color book cover of The Flower Farmer Specialty Cut Flowers cover

Crop Planning on Organic Vegetable Farms

Crop Planning Book

This book gives you a field-tested eleven step planning approach that will take some of the chaos out of your business and help you move towards profitability. In steps one and two, you’ll learn how to set realistic financial goals and figure out how to meet them through your marketing outlets. In steps three to eight, you will learn how to develop an actual crop plan. In step nine, you’ll learn how to implement your crop plan and record what actually happens in the field. In steps ten and eleven, you will analyze how your crop plan fared and start planning for next year.
Click here to order



These articles have recently been added to Growing for Market Online

 

Selling flowers to supermarkets

(in: Archive)
 

Turmeric: like ginger, but not

(in: Archive)
 

Adding shiitakes to a market farm

(in: Archive)
 

Experiment with ‘Eat-All Greens’

(in: Archive)
 

How to grow microgreens

(in: Archive)
 

Disease in the winter greenhouse

(in: Archive)
 

Planning successions in the hoophouse

(in: Archive)
 

Financial statements, Part 2 How to gather the data that will provide meaningful information

(in: Archive)
 

Talk about money with other farmers

(in: Archive)
 

The lure of ginger Growers love it, but it’s not easy

(in: Archive)
 
Free Farmers Market Issue